Matt Coneybeare

MC

What It’s Like to Run After Recovering From Covid-19

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I live in New York City and am married to an Emergency Physician, so it may not come as a surprise when I say that I contracted Covid-19 three weeks ago. While I did not get tested, my wife, who had the exact same symptoms, did get swabbed at work and was positive, so it is almost certain that I had the ‘rona as well.

via GIPHY

There have been many accounts of what it feels like generally, so I thought I would talk about how I dealt with contracting the disease, recovery, and dealing with the remnants afterwards as it pertains to my running.

How to Make an HTML Signature in Apple Mail for macOS Catalina 10.15

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There are plenty of tutorials online to create an HTML signature in Apple Mail with older versions of macOS/OS X. You can even find one of my other tutorials on how to add HTML Signatures in Lion, Mountain Lion, iOS 7, Mavericks, Yosemite, El Capitan, Sierra, High Sierra, or Mojave. However, the process has changed ever so slightly for the new macOS Catalina (10.15). Here is how to do it:

Coding Challenge: Detecting Unique Friend Circles in NxN Matrix

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Friend Circle. Photo by Margarida CSilva on Unsplash

Lately I’ve been trying to challenge myself by taking a stab at some common coding questions asked in software engineering job interviews. After years of working on apps you would think that this kind of thing comes easy, but software development in the modern age comes with a heavy side of Googling and lookup, so challenging your brain in this way to implement an algorithm or process from just its definition or description is good practice to keep you sharp.

Yesterday, I came across a question on LeetCode that asked me to find the total number of friend circles given an N by N matrix showing their relationships. Here is how I implemented a solution in ruby:

Coding Challenge: Remove and Rearrange Array Elements In-Place in O(1) Memory and o(n) Time

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Lately I’ve been trying to challenge myself by taking a stab at some common coding questions asked in software engineering job interviews. After years of working on apps you would think that this kind of thing comes easy, but software development in the modern age comes with a heavy side of Googling and lookup, so challenging your brain in this way to implement an algorithm or process from just its definition or description is good practice to keep you sharp.

Yesterday, I came across a question on LeetCode that was asking me to remove all elements of an array that match a certain value. Pretty simple right?

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array - [value]

Wrong. There is a catch which means this above solution cannot be used. We are required to perform the removal in constant O(1) memory, so we can’t create any new arrays, or modify the existing array. We are asked to do it in O(n) time as well. So we need to modify the array in place, while looping over its length max one time. Here’s how I did it.

Coding Challenge: Implement a Square Root Function

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(not the sqrt function)

Lately I’ve been trying to challenge myself by taking a stab at some common coding questions asked in software engineering job interviews. After years of working on apps you would think that this kind of thing comes easy, but software development in the modern age comes with a heavy side of Googling and lookup, so challenging your brain in this way to implement an algorithm or process from just its definition is good practice to keep you sharp.

Yesterday, I came across a question which was rated on LeetCode as EASY and decided to give it a go, finding that the optimal answer was anything but easy. The question was:

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Implement int sqrt(int x).
 - Compute and return the square root of x, where x is guaranteed to be a non-negative integer.
 - Since the return type is an integer, the decimal digits are truncated and only the integer part of the result is returned.

Here’s how I naively implemented that in ruby.

Coding Challenge: Finding the Longest Absolute Path in an Abstracted File System Display

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Lately I’ve been trying to challenge myself by taking a stab at some common coding questions asked in software engineering job interviews. After years of working on apps you would think that this kind of thing comes easy, but software development in the modern age comes with a heavy side of Googling and lookup, and very few truly unique problems, so challenging your brain in this way is good practice to keep you sharp.

I’ve been working lately on LeetCode and came across this interesting problem titled Longest Absolute File Path. The problem gives us an abstracted, serialized representation of a file system directory structure, and asks us to find the longest absolute file name in the system.

In this representation, each \n represents the end of line (dir or file), and each \t corresponds to the files depth in the system, though there is no information one can deduce about its path to get to that depth. For example, this string…

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"dir\n\tsubdir1\n\t\tfile1.ext\n\t\tsubsubdir1\n\tsubdir2\n\t\tsubsubdir2\n\t\t\tfile2.ext"

…actually maps to a directory that graphically looks like this:

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dir
    subdir1
        file1.ext
        subsubdir1
    subdir2
        subsubdir2
            file2.ext

Coding Challenge: Converting Integers to Binary String Representations in Ruby

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Lately I’ve been trying to challenge myself by taking a stab at some common coding questions asked in software engineering job interviews. After years of working on apps you would think that this kind of thing comes easy, but software development in the modern age comes with a heavy side of Googling and lookup, so challenging your brain in this way to implement an algorithm or process from just its definition is good practice to keep you sharp.

I had come across a practice coding question which required me to compare integers and binary strings, and I realized that I had forgotten how to convert an integer to binary. Looking it up, the algoritm is pretty simple:

To convert integer to binary, start with the integer in question and divide it by 2 keeping notice of the quotient and the remainder. Continue dividing the quotient by 2 until you get a quotient of zero. Then just write out the remainders in the reverse order.
Angular in Depth

Here’s how I implemented that in ruby.

Coding Challenge: Implementing QuickSort in Ruby

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Lately I’ve been trying to challenge myself by taking a stab at some common coding questions asked in software engineering job interviews. After years of working on apps you would think that this kind of thing comes easy, but software development in the modern age comes with a heavy side of Googling and lookup, so challenging your brain in this way to implement an algorithm or process from just its definition is good practice to keep you sharp.

Previously, I had implemented MergeSort in Ruby, so today I am going to take the next step and implement the faster QuickSort algorithm.

Coding Challenge: Implementing MergeSort in Ruby

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Lately I’ve been trying to challenge myself by taking a stab at some common coding questions asked in software engineering job interviews. After years of working on apps you would think that this kind of thing comes easy, but software development in the modern age comes with a heavy side of Googling and lookup, so challenging your brain in this way to come up with or code an algorithm or process from scratch without that assistance is good practice to keep you sharp.

Previously, I had come up with three solutions of finding a missing number in array of 1 through 100, and today, after reintroducing myself to the algorithm, I am going to implement a O(N) search method: MergeSort.

Coding Challenge: Find Missing Number in Array of 1 Through 100

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Lately I’ve been trying to challenge myself by taking a stab at some common coding questions asked in software engineering job interviews. After years of working on apps you would think that this kind of thing comes easy, but software development in the modern age comes with a heavy side of Googling and lookup, so challenging your brain in this way to come up with an algorithm or process from scratch without that assistance is good practice to keep you sharp.

One of the first problems I attempted was the relatively easy:

How do you find the missing number in a given integer array of 1 to 100?

My name is Matt Coneybeare, I design and develop for the web, iOS (iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch), and MacOS out of New York City. In 2008 I started a software company called Urban Apps that has made some pretty popular apps such as Ambiance and Hourly News. In 2019, I joined the team at Ticket Evolution as a Senior Software Engineer. My current Stack Overflow reputation is about 27k.

I was a Rockstar a decade ago, but then went back to school and collected a Bachelor's Degree in Computer Science from U.C. Berkeley and a MBA from Quantic. Now I am settled down with my beautiful wife Di and our dog Hamachi. When not at my desk, I love exploring New York City as a Yelp Elite, or training for marathons.

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